POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (7)

Another story to be added to Postcards from Spain comes from local and family history researcher Linda Gowans from Sunderland. Linda was involved in a project researching the World War 2 memorial board at St Gabriels Church in Sunderland, when she came across two men who were involved in the Spanish Civil War….Both men also received O.B.E awards in the New Year Honours list of January 1946. The first was Captain Frederick Robinson of 14 Hawarden Cresent, Sunderland who was Master of SS Garesfield. He was at sea a total of 30 years, served in both World Wars and brought food supplies to the people of Spain fighting General Franco.

I searched for some background on Frederick and found on the 1939 register taken just before the Second World War he was employed as Master Mariner on SS.Knitsley. He lived with his wife Elizabeth and had one son Frederick who was 5 year old.

Linda added….The second is Captain William Gould, Master of S.S. Monkleigh, he had been at sea for a total of 42 years. During World War One and Two he was torpedoed four times, twice in each war. He also ran the blockade to bring supplies to Spain during the Spanish Civil War.

Also searched for some background on William and found that on the 1891 census he was 4 year old and lived at 9 Princes Street, Sunderland with his father Thomas, who was a mariner, his mother Jane and brother George. Ten year later William was an apprentice steam engineer.

In 1910 he married Maggie Graham, they had two daughters Irene and Kathleen, and a son, William junior. Not long afterwards his wife Maggie died, aged 32. William remarried to Ada Moore in 1922, and three more children were born, Thomas, James and Poppy.

Linda also mentioned William and Ada’s son Thomas who joined the British Armed Forces but only for a short time as it ended in tragic circumstances….. Thomas decided not to follow his father to sea and in 1942 joined the RAF, gaining his wings in South Africa in 1943.

On April 29th 1945 he was part of 3 man Advanced Flying Unit out on a training flight. Joining Pilot Officer Thomas Gould on board were Flying Officer Gordon Aubrey from the Royal Canadian Air Force, and Sergeant Howard Montgomery of the Royal Australian Air Force.

They took off from RAF South Cerney, Gloucestershire but ran into poor weather and visibility was very low due to a snowstorm. While flying at low altitude the aircraft hit tree tops and crashed in a wooded area at New Barn Farm, Temple Guiting. All three men on board were killed. Thomas was only 21.

His body was brought home for burial at Bishopwearmouth, Sunderland and his grave bears the inscription, ‘His life, a noble sacrifice’.

A tragic end to a young man’s life, and sad that he went before his father William who died 7th April 1950.

 If you have any information about the North East men and women who were in any way involved in the Spanish Civil War please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com

 Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (6)

Here’s another interesting article for the series about the Spanish Civil War, International Brigades Memorial Trust member, Tony Fox, looks at representation from North East men during the conflict…….I discovered that volunteers travelled to Spain together, Frank Graham left Sunderland on 15th December 1936 with friends, Tommy Dolan and Bill Lower. In London the groups were sent to the Communist Party offices at 16 King Street to meet the formidable ‘Robby’ Robson who would assess their suitability, in military and political terms. Robson explained in detail the dangers to be faced.

On acceptance volunteers were told to purchase weekend return rail-tickets from Victoria Railway Station to Paris, as this did not require a passport. In France volunteers had to act with discretion as groups of volunteers would occasionally be arrested and repatriated. The recruitment of the International Brigades was coordinated by the Communist Party in Paris.

On arrival in Paris the volunteers would meet the liaison, Charlotte Haldane. It was in the red-light district of Paris they underwent medical examination and checks on their political reliability. From Paris they would travel to the Spanish border by train on what became known as ‘The Red Express’, then travel across the frontier by bus or train.

After February they would be smuggled in groups past non-intervention patrols, over the top of the Pyrenees. Some volunteers were smuggled onto ships which attempted to break through the naval blockade of patrolling Royal Navy warships and Italian submarines.

Bill Lower, Frank Graham’s companion from Sunderland, died along with 54 volunteers and about 100 passengers and crew when the SS Ciudad de Barcelona was torpedoed by an Italian submarine in May 1937.

Once across the frontier, they would be taken to the International Brigade headquarters at Albacete, where volunteers would be vetted again, processed and divided up by nationality to be placed into the different linguistic battalions of the International Brigades. British speakers were placed in the XVI Battalion of the XV Brigade.

Frank Graham and Bert Overton, from Stockton arrived at the Madrigueras training base on 1st January, four of the seven Stockton men I am studying arrived in Spain the following week. At Madrigueras the Brigaders with military training instructed the others. Bert Overton had been in the Welsh Guards, therefore he was made an officer in No.4 Company.

Officers, commissars and specialists received separate instruction, leading activists from the North East took key positions in the British Battalion: George Aitken would be the first Political Commissar for the British Battalion, Frank Graham would command 3rd section of No.1 Company until later becoming a scout.

Bill Meredith, a well know activist from Tyneside, would later command No.2 Company. Bob Elliott would be the Political Commissar for No.2 Company with Wilf Jobling his deputy commissar.

The North East continued to be overly represented as officers and Commissars throughout the conflict; later in the war Sunderland born Bob Cooney became Battalion Commissar, Stockton’s Otto Estensen was Commissar and commanded the anti-tank Battery. Dave Goodman from Middlesbrough became the No. 4 Company Commissar on his arrival in Spain in January 1938.

More stories soon from the front line of the Spanish Civil War in Postcards from Spain.

If you have any information about North East men and women who were in any way involved in the Spanish Civil War please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com

Sources:

The Battle of Jarama 1937 by Frank Graham. Published 1987

Unlikely Warriors by Richard Baxell. Publisher Aurum Press 2012

Fred Thomas diaries currently being transcribed for the Imperial War Museum by Alan Warren.

http://www.international-brigades.org.uk/

Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (5)

After recent posts about the Spanish Civil War, I asked for any information relating to the North East men and women who were involved. Tony Fox from Stockton immediately made contact…..I am a member of the International Brigades Memorial Trust which has been very supportive to my work, especially the President Marlene Sidaway and the Historian Richard Baxell.

I’m currently working on two projects about men and women from the North East who traveled to Spain during the civil war.

Middlesbrough Mayor Ray Mallon, Marlene Sidaway and Duncan Longstaff (son of Johnny Longstaff).

The first project is with Middlesbrough Council on the memorial plaque in place at Middlesbrough Town Hall. The plaque is for ten men from Teesside who served in the International Brigades, and was produced in 1939. It is thought to be the first Brigades memorial produced in the UK.

I am also working on a memorial to Stockton’s International Brigaders which I will write about in another post.

Reading your previous post Postcards from Spain (1) I can add information about the two men from Whitburn who didn’t have any dates or locations when they were killed in Spain.

Edward Tattam listed as ‘Missing/killed in action 17/3/1938 at Belchite-Caspe, Aragon.

William Tattam is listed as ‘date of death 17th July 1937, believed to have died when the lorry he was riding in overturned on the way to Brunete’.

Harry Reynolds is listed as ‘date of death February 1937 at Jarama. With a very interesting footnote – ‘Left for Spain in a group led by Wilf Jobling’.

This confirms one of my assumptions. I knew that the volunteers traveled in groups to Spain but thought they were led by ‘responsibles’ – leading activists who cared for the volunteers and provided political guidance.

As Harry Reynolds, led by Wilf Jobling, arrived in Spain at the same time as the men I am studying, the Teesside Brigaders, it is reasonable to assume that the North East volunteers traveled together as a group.

Tony added more detail to the story about the men behind the North East recruitment…..

North East recruitment of volunteers was organised by a small group of close friends who were graduates of the International Lenin School in Moscow.

George Aitken was the North East Coast District Secretary, covering Northumberland and Durham. George Short was a Communist Party Central Committee member and Teesside Secretary of the NUWM, he originated from Chopwell, locally known as ‘Little Moscow’ as it had a Communist club.

Wilf Jobling, a NUWM executive committee member also from Chopwell who I mentioned earlier.

South Shields men were recruited by a guy called Charlie Woods. Finally a Sunderland branch activist, Frank Graham, in recruiting twenty volunteers, it was the largest individual town contingent in the North East.

Posting soon another addition to Postcards from Spain from Tony Fox. If you have any information about the North East men and women who were in any way involved in the Spanish Civil War please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com.

Sources: No Justice Without a Struggle:The National Unemployed Workers Movement in the North East 1920-40 by Don Watson. Merlin Press 2014.

North Eastern Daily Gazette, 2 May 1935

From the Tees to the Ebro David Goodman CPGB, 1986.

 Interview of Charlie Wood https://www.amber-online.com/collection/no-pasaran/

http://www.international-brigades.org.uk/

 https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/stocktonbrigaders

 Gary Alikivi  April 2020

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (4)

Following on from the previous posts focusing on the Spanish Civil War, in this one we find out how a South Shields man was involved.

Firstly, an important note, if relatives of Norman Leathley Ramsey can add any information to this post, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

So who was Norman ?

He was born in South Shields in 1894 and at 6 year old lived at 175 South Frederick Street in the Tyne Dock area of the town. His father Thomas was a coal trimmer, his mother Isabella, had four more children. A few year later the family moved to 49 Eleanor Street, although Norman wasn’t registered at this address as he had started his career at sea.

After the First World War Norman was awarded a Mercantile Marine British Medal, was married to Minnie Legross and the couple were living at 51 Broughton Road, South Shields. By 1922 he was employed as a ship’s butcher at 154 Laygate Lane.

With the coronavirus pandemic shutting down the local library I have been unable to search for Norman in South Shields after 1922, but his name did pop up 15 years later in a story printed in the Hartlepool Mail on April 22nd 1937 about the Spanish Civil War.

Blockade Runners Challenged: Bilbao Position:

‘General Franco has taken up the challenge of the British vessels who are awaiting opportunities to run the blockade of the insurgent warships to Bilbao and other Basque Government ports. His Government at Burgos has announced over the wireless to foreign Governments that the Nationalists in future will lay mines in front of all the ports in Government hands’, reports Reuter.

A St Jean de Lux message says that a ‘Mr Norman Leatherly Ramsey of South Shields, says he is representing the owners of a British cargo steamer, is willing to run the insurgent blockade if the Basque Government will guarantee the value of the vessel’.

This was the statement he made after he had been detained by local police yesterday on the instructions of a Belgian control officer, taken to the police station and charged with not having proper papers. On the production of his passport, which was in order, he was released.

The report went on to say…Shore batteries have shelled three insurgent trawlers which attempted to seize a number of fishing vessels anchored off Lequeitio, North East of Bilbao’.

For some background to the story, in 1936 Spain elected a government committed to change. The army under General Franco rebelled and what followed were three years of a Civil War. Franco was helped by the Italian dictator Mussolini and Hitler in Germany.

This led to a food shortage in the Republican Basque region of Northern Spain, as the Nationalists had set up a blockade and threatened to sink British food aid ships who approached ports.

George Orwell, in his book Homage to Catalonia, gave an account of his personal experiences and observations in the war. ‘Bread was scarce and the cheaper sorts were being adulterated with rice. Milk and sugar were very scarce and tobacco almost non-existent. The queues of women waiting to buy olive oil were controlled by mounted Civil Guards’.

Further research from various sources revealed that the Newcastle steamer ship, Hamsterley, was at the head of a small convoy of three British food aid ships who made a run on the blockade. On board the Hamsterley, was our man Norman Ramsey, a Merchant Seaman from South Shields.

He gave the North Mail newspaper a dramatic account of how the British flagship Hood and destroyer Firedrake went into action to protect the convoy against the Nationalist cruiser, Almirante Cervera and the armed trawler Galerna….

The Almirante Cervera signalled to us to stop. When we failed to do so, she showed her disapproval by sending a shell across our bows. Firedrake darted in between us and the Nationalist cruiser.

We carried on again towards Bilbao and were at the head of the convoy when another shell burst in the sea. Firedrake swung out her torpedo tubes and Hood cleared her decks for action. Her mighty guns looked terrifying. Firedrake signalled to the trawler Galerna that she must not meddle with British ships.

The trawler tried to get in between us and the three-mile limit but Firedrake headed her off until we had passed inside the limit. Then the Galerna tried to reach us again, but the shore batteries at Bilbao opened fire’.

On April 23rd 1937 the three British food aid ships docked at Bilbao. 35 km’s away was the ancient city of Guernica, where late in the afternoon of the 26th April German aircraft appeared above the city. In support of the Nationalists, the Nazi’s dropped their bombs on purely a civilian target. The destruction swung British public opinion towards the Republican cause.

 

The authorities took the opportunity to show the British crews the devastation, this photograph (above) of refugees on the road from Guernica was taken by Norman Ramsey shortly after the city was bombed.

Ramsey also photographed the ruins at the centre of the city. His pictures were published in the North Mail and Newcastle Chronicle after he returned home in May.

On it’s next voyage to Bilbao carrying coal, the Hamsterley took part in evacuating refugees to French ports, along with the Newcastle steamer Backworth. Like other North East ships trading with Bilbao, the Hamsterley brought back iron ore, arriving with its cargo at Tyne Dock.

Where did Norman go next ?

On the 1939 Second World War register Norman was employed as a Water Clerk living with his family at 118 & 120 Broughton Road, South Shields. His wife Minnie, worked in the Off Licence at 120. The family lived here until 1962 before moving to another house in the town.

After living a full life, Norman sadly passed away in 1967, but the story of his work in helping the Spanish people in 1937 and the powerful photographs he took in Guernica, will live on.

If you have any information about the North East men and women who were in any way involved in the Spanish Civil War please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com

Research: Ancestry, The Word, South Shields, Discovery Museum and 

Local Studies collection, Newcastle City Library.

 Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (3)

Unfortunately due to the Coronavirus pandemic the Local History library is closed so confirming details about the South Shields resident featured in this post has proven a bit more difficult. If a relative is out there please don’t hesitate to get in touch. We are looking at a Captain C.W. Dick who was in command of a ship that ran a blockade during the Spanish Civil War.

 

The Hansard revealed questions were asked in the House of Commons about the Civil War and the role of British Merchant ships. First Lord Admiralty, Sir Samuel Hoare said. ’The instructions to His Majesty’s ships have, since the beginning of the civil war in Spain, been to the effect that if it comes to the knowledge of a British man-of-war that a British merchant ship is being interfered with on the high seas by a Spanish warship, the British ship is to be afforded protection’.

I came across a newspaper report in The Shields Gazette, April 28th 1937 that featured Capt. C.W. Dick and the Olavus, a ship built in South Shields in 1920 at the Chas Rennoldson & Co. yard.

EXPECTED BATTLE ANY MINUTE (Headline)

Shields Man Who Ran Blockade

The Hull steamer Olavus under the command of Capt. C.W.Dick of South Shields which recently ran the blockade of Bilbao is expected to make a further effort next week.

It is understood she will sail from Liverpool for Barcelona or Valencia with a cargo of foodstuffs. The crew however, have intimated to owners, the Ohlson Steam Shipping Company from Hull, that they will not sail again for Spain under any circumstances.

The crew consists of British engineers and Dutch seamen who were signed on at Rotterdam after the original Shields crew had refused to sign on again for Spain.

For the past day or two Capt. Dick, whose home is in Ravenbourne Terrace, has been in Rotterdam awaiting instructions from the owners. At one time it was thought the Olavus would sail again from Holland, but the crew intimated that they did not wish to sail on any conditions.

Captain Dick’s last voyage to Bilbao was an exciting one. In letters to his wife he describes how the Olavus and the Thorpehall, were at one time surrounded by six battleships representing the insurgents.

‘Thank goodness it is all over and we are out of danger. It has been a great responsibility with all these men’s lives’. He explained that the reported mutiny on board the Olavus was pure fiction. ‘There was no trouble with the crew when she left Nantes. The only trouble we had was at the French port, where the crew of Dutchmen, learning they were to sail for Bilbao, asked to be paid off’.

Captain Dick pointed out that he could not do this and the crew approached their consul, who told them that nothing could be done, and that they would have to sail.

Thirty hours out from Nantes, they were inspected by a rebel cruiser, but no action was taken until two hours later when a shot was fired over the Olavus. He carried on at full speed for about five minutes, then the guns of the harbour fortress began to speak.

Capt. Dick was almost blinded by the second shot, which fell 40 feet astern the Olavus and thinking that the fortress had mistaken him for a rebel gunboat or did not want him to enter until daylight, he put about.

HMS Hood.

In running for the open sea again, the Olavus went through the supposed minefields. The crew by this time were terrified stated Capt. Dick. Describing the holding up of the Thorpehall, Capt. Dick said that Spanish, German and British ships had cleared their decks for action.

‘I expected a battle to start any minute’ he stated in a letter. ‘I was waiting for the rebel cruiser to start, but he slunk away followed by one of our fellows’.

After leaving Bilbao, the Olavus was stopped by a rebel cruiser and the German battleship Von Spree. The German ordered Capt. Dick to alter course and head for land. Unable to offer resistance and confident that the Olavus was about to be interned, the captain did so.

A few minutes later however HMS Hood arrived on the scene and the rebel and German gunboats steamed away. The Hood signalled to the Olavus ‘Good night and good voyage’.

A search reveals that the Thorpehall was attacked and eventually sunk near Valencia on 25th May 1938. HMS Hood was sunk during the Battle of the Denmark Strait in the Second World War, May 1941.

But what happened after 1937 for Captain C.W.Dick ? There is a record of a British Prisoner of War held in Japan on 15th Feb 1942. Is that him ? Hopefully more information can be found to confirm the story.

More research will be done when the Local History libraries open but for now in Postcards from Spain, the search goes on for North East stories from the Spanish Civil War. If you have any information please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com

Gary Alikivi  April  2020.

Sources: Ancestry, Hansard and The Shields Gazette.

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (2)

I first came across the Spanish Civil War in 2012 when I was researching a woman called Eileen O’Shaughnessy. Eileen was born in South Shields and to cut a very long story short, was married to the writer George Orwell. The couple spent some time in Barcelona during the civil war. George went a few month earlier than Eileen to write a story but he ended up joining the militia in their fight against fascism – you could say he replaced his pen for a gun.

Below is a photograph taken on the front line of the war, with Orwell the largest figure at the back and his wife Eileen crouching behind the machine gun. In an earlier post I talked about a documentary about Eileen that I made (Wildflower 2014) and how I first saw this photograph it had an effect which was the catalyst in making the film.

In the documentary I wanted to include this part of their life together, so contacted a guy called Alan Warren. Alan was living in Barcelona, and with the organisation Porta de la Historia, they had done mountains of research into the Spanish Civil War and Orwell. We met up in a café on Las Ramblas and talked about how we could tell this part of Eileen’s story.

Los Carocoles restaurant.

Next day Alan guided me to the locations Orwell wrote about in Homage to Catalonia, an account of his personal experiences during the civil war. Through research we came across letters written by Eileen when she was in Barcelona. She mentioned going to a restaurant, Los Caracoles, just off Las Ramblas. We went there and after some negotiation by Alan in Spanish, with the owner Aurora Bofarull, I filmed a short sequence to include in the documentary – we also got a free meal of eggs and peppers.

I asked Alan to tell me about the group he is working with …..Porta de la Historia (PdlH) is a group of historians and enthusiasts based in Spain and Catalonia who are interested in the hidden history of the Spanish Civil War 1936-39, and the 35,000 men and women from 52 different countries who came to support the Spanish Republic, many of whom served in the International Brigades.

For over ten years PdlH has conducted extensive Field Research and study of the many first hand accounts to allow the hidden landscape, of not just the battles, but also places in the rear guard and hospitals, to come alive. Standing at the same spot described by an International brigader over eighty years ago is an experience to be treasured. In addition, the use of cameras during the War, by the likes of Robert Capa and Gerda Taro has allowed many locations to be identified.

More importantly, local contacts and knowledge allows visitors to see parts of Spain that are rarely visited by tourists. It is, to a certain extent, the real Spain.

Apart from many bespoke tours for one to four people, larger school trips are also offered. In addition, film and documentary work is common, as well as editorial advice for historians.

The Field of Research is large. It is said that more books have been written about the Spanish Civil War than World War Two. It has been called ‘The Last Crusade’ and ‘The first Battle of World War Two’.

The passion, romanticism, beliefs and idealism of both sides is also full of violence, hate and bloody revenge. A polarising event of such tragedy that even now many families will not talk about it.

However, Porta de la Historia is slowly allowing this subject to be addressed more openly. And hopefully the distance between now and then, as well as some government support, is allowing grandchildren and great grandchildren to try and understand the conflict that tore Spain apart. A nation that forgets it’s history is condemned to repeat it.

This work is a pleasure and a responsiblity. Having known many International brigaders in later life, it is important to explain and try to understand this period objectively and factually. And there is still so much more to explore and discover in some beautiful parts of Spain.

For more information contact the organisation at:  pdlhistoria@gmail.com or
www.pdlhistoria.wordpress.com

If you have any information about the North East men and women who were in any way involved in the Spanish Civil War please get in touch at garyalikivi@yahoo.com

 Gary Alikivi   April 2020.

POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN (1)

In 1936 International Brigades, including more than 100 men and women from the North East, travelled to Spain to fight against General Franco, who had rebelled against the newly-elected democratic government. Many countries saw that a Franco victory would strengthen fascism in Europe, and threaten another world war.

The Spanish Civil War inspired artists, writers and musicians to comment….

‘Holes in your head today, But I’m a pacifist, I’ve walked La Ramblas but not with real intent’…. sang the The Manic Street Preachers on ‘If You Tolerate This, Your Children Will Be Next’ and before that ‘Spanish Bombs’ by The Clash… Bullet holes in the cemetery walls. The freedom fighters died upon the hill. They sang the red flag. They wore the black one’.

Author, George Orwell wrote a personal account of his experiences of the war in his book Homage to Catalonia….‘In Barcelona there was a peculiar evil feeling in the air – an atmosphere of suspicion, fear, uncertainty, and veiled hatred’.

Orwell had originally gone to Spain to write some newspaper articles, but joined the militia…. ‘Almost immediately, because in that atmosphere it seemed the only conceivable thing to do. Practically every building had been seized by the workers and was draped with red and black flags of the Anarchists: every wall had been scrawled with the hammer and sickle and with initials of revolutionary parties’.

Spanish artist Pablo Picasso created one of the most powerful images of war and destruction, after seeing the city of Guernica bombed by Nazi Germany at the request of Franco’s Nationalists.

To find out more about the North East connection I contacted Stockton based Tony Fox from the International Brigades Memorial Trust. He passed on a list of North East names held in the International Brigade Archive in London and Moscow. He also talked about various memorials to honour the men….On the Newcastle memorial there is a list of 35 men who died, 10 who died on the Teesside memorial, and I am writing about 8 volunteers from Stockton, 3 were killed’.

A selection of names from the archives included South Shields men John Palzeard who died in 1937 at Jarama, and Stephen Codling who died on 31st March 1938 in Calacette. There is no dates yet for brothers Edward and William Tattam from Whitburn and for Harry Reynolds in Wallsend.

A number of deaths occurred during 1937, Robert Coutts, from North Shields died in Las Rozas. From Sunderland, Thomas Dolan and Edgar Wilkinson died at Jarama. Ernest Lower, died by drowning in SS City of Barcelona and Robert Mackie, died at Brunete.

From Gateshead, John Ferguson, Frank Keery, Alfred Lichfield, William Young and Harry Smith all died at the Battle of Jarama.

I asked Tony if the details are being updated as more information becomes available… ‘The opening of the Moscow files brought a change, up until very recently the focus was on those who fell. As far as we know, our Stockton memorial will be the first to name all the men from a geographical area who volunteered’.

In 2016, Mike Kelly, journalist from Newcastle’s Chronicle, wrote about an information panel (pic. above) which was unveiled in the grounds of Newcastle Civic Centre featuring names of 35 men who were killed in action.

Kelly spoke with the daughter of Harry Smith from Gateshead who died at the Battle of Jarama in 1937. She remembers the stories her mum told of him….He was there three weeks before he was shot and wounded at the Battle of Jarama. He was taken to a field hospital which was blown up and he died there.  My dad was interested in politics and joined up because he said if General Franco wasn’t stopped it would leave the way open for Hitler’.

Sadly Franco wasn’t stopped and remained in power until his death in 1975. The Spanish Civil War ended on 1st April 1939, by 1st September Hitler’s Nazi Germany had invaded Poland and the world was plunged into another war. One that would last six years and claim millions of lives, resulting in a new cold war between the emerging superpowers of the USA and the Soviet Union.

If you have any information about the North East men and women who fought for the International Brigades please get in touch.

Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

Research from Local Studies, Newcastle City Library.

HELLO TOMORROW: Changing Face of South Shields in photographs (4)

For the past 10 years I’ve set myself a documentary project capturing the changing face of South Shields. Included are a small selection of the photographs.

This is the seafront harbour where the river Tyne meets the North Sea. The new Littlehaven Promenade replacing an old path and car park. Previous posts feature other area’s of the town.

In 2013 South Tyneside Council proposed a very bold £100 million regeneration project for the town, and public consultations were held. Progress on different phases of the regeneration is ongoing as more developments are planned.

So far the council have delivered – Hello Tomorrow is not just a slogan on the posters.

Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

HELLO TOMORROW: Changing Face of South Shields in photographs (3)

For the past 10 years I’ve set myself a documentary project capturing the changing face of South Shields. Included are a small selection of the photographs.

This is Harton Quay next to the river Tyne, the ferry landing, the BT building and The Customs House theatre & arts venue. It’s also next to The Word and the Market, two area’s that have benefited from the 365 Town Centre Vision regeneration. Following posts will feature other area’s of the town.

In 2013 South Tyneside Council proposed a very bold £100 million regeneration project for the town, and public consultations were held. Progress on different phases of the regeneration is ongoing as more developments are planned.

So far the council have delivered – Hello Tomorrow is not just a slogan on the posters.

Gary Alikivi  April 2020.

HELLO TOMORROW: Changing Face of South Shields in photographs (2)

For the past 10 years I’ve set myself a documentary project capturing the changing face of South Shields. Included are a small selection of the photographs. This is the 250 year old market at the top of King Street and next to The Word featured on the last post. Following posts will include other area’s of the town.

In 2013 South Tyneside Council proposed a very bold £100 million regeneration project for the town, and public consultations were held. Progress on different phases of the regeneration is ongoing as more developments are planned.

So far the council have delivered – Hello Tomorrow is not just a slogan on the posters.

Gary Alikivi  April 2020.